MAS Attack SD

MAS Attack SD

March 19th from 6-10pm. ARTRA has hosted international exchange shows, organized alternative art fairs, and put an impressive catalog of projects together alongside the efforts of the directors who maintain full time curatorial practices in the greater Los Angeles area. In this 12th iteration of MAS ATTACK (Mutual Appreciation Society) 100 Los Angeles artists and 100 San Diego artists come together for this one-night event at San Diego’s Art Institute in Balboa Park. Music provided by DJ Ana Brown. Los Angeles Artists: Aaron Giesel Ana Marini Andrea Kitts Senn Annie Clavel April Bey Ben Jackel Betsy Enzensberger Bibi Davidson Caiti Slegr Campbell Laird Carrie Kaplan Cathleen Abalos Cathy Ellis Chenhung Chen Chris Mercier Christian Ramirez Conchi Sanford Crystal Fischetti Dani Dodge David Michael Lee David Spanbock Elena Johnson Elisa Salcedo Elizabeth Valdez Feng Ling Francesca Quintano Francisco Alvarado Gay Summer Sadow Rick Gloria Plascencia Greg Schenk Gul Cagin HK Zamani James Goodwin Jill Smith John Geary Jon Measures Juan Gomez Juri Koll Justin Smith Karen Karlsson Karrie Ross Khang Bao Nguyen Kristine Schomaker Laurel Paley Laurie Hassold Lidia Shaddow Lillian Abel Lori Pond Lorraine Heitzman Malado Francine Malka Nedivi Matt Driggs Max Presneill Mela Marsh Melanie Moore Michael Chomick Michael Giancristiano Michael McCall Mike Vegas Natasha Shoro Parinya Champ Pat Gainor Paulin Paris Peggy Zask Peta Orbach Renee Tanner Richard Andres Robert Arieas Robert Soffian Ron Therrio Rouzanna Berberian Scott Trimble Shauna La Sheli Silverio Shelley Heffler Shula Singer Arbel Sijia Chen Steve Nossan Steve Seleska Susan Amorde Ted Meyer Todd Carpenter Tony Pinto Ty Pownall Valerie Wilcox Vanessa Madrid Veda B Kaya Wini Brewer Yoony Takeuchi Zeina Baltagi...
Lime Light

Lime Light

Lime Light Opening Reception: June 7, 2014 from 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Exhibition Date: June 7 – June 14, 2014 (By Appointment) Location: 13709 Cordary Avenue #14 Hawthorne, CA 90250 thinhstudio presents “Lime Light” curated by Thinh Nguyen, featuring LA-based artists,  Debra Bainculli, Julienne Hsu, Melanie Moore, Alan Nakagawa, and Jane Gillespie Pryor. The opening reception on Saturday June 7th from 6 – 9 pm will include a one-time-only special participatory installation by Alan Nakagawa, where audience members not only can hear, but also physically experience the sound that he composed using a series of frequencies inspired by the work of 1930s scientist Royal Rife. Nakagawa will compose a sound work consisting of audible and sub-sonic tones utilizing modulators, oscillators, effect boxes, and found objects, where attendee can lay on the bed-like structures to feel the tonal composition. Melanie Moore, Debra Bainculli, and Julienne Hsu will be showing their latest paintings inspired by a range of topics from cellular biological mutation resembling transitions of mitosis or embryonic growth, the effects of organic versus non-organic practices within industrialized farming on soil and depletion of our water resources, to underground dog fighting and aggression as metaphor for personal social and cultural dominance in a “dog eat dog world”. Showing along with these paintings is Jane Gillespie Pryor new sculptures. They resemble traps or shelters that seems temporal, precarious and potentially dangerous as they elicit the fragility of existence, where permanence and stability are rarely found. Resident artists that will be opening their studios during the reception include: renowned sculptor Robert Wilhite and multimedia artist Paulin Paris. Paris will introduce his own curatorial artists, which will include Philille Charpentier...
The Unbearable Lightness of Form

The Unbearable Lightness of Form

The Unbearable Lightness of Form, a two person show at Autonomie with David French. June 9th 2012, 7:30 – 10pm Melanie Moore The work of Melanie Moore revolves around themes both organic and cosmic, formal and natural. Hers is an evolving art, one based on the germination of hidden and secret processes. As a sustained meditation on macro and micro-logical processes, Moore’s abstract paintings often resemble cellular mitosis, embryonic growth, or the nebulous becomings of celestial bodies. Everywhere we find evidence of divergent permutations, sudden mutations and the slow gestation of trace forms in the process of unfolding. Moore’s work was previously invested in time-based processes and dissection of abstract forms. She achieved this through different strategies of taxonomy, often painting on multi-layered transparent panels that could be recombined to form a single work. As a virtual vivisection of gestural spills, pours and selective interventions, theses early works subdivided action painting into specific acts by highlighting the temporal dimension of gestural imagery. Over time, these additive strategies gave way to a dialog that was more overtly concerned with the rhetorics of display and disparate knowledges of application. This gave her work a new sense of complexity and a certain distance from expressive models of abstract painting that are still very much in vague today. Most recently however, her art practice has begun to capitalize on the power of singular forms and iconic images. Often highlighting just one or two floating forms, and sticking to a reduced pallet dominated by grays, black and silvers, Moore has chosen to focus on those elements which have become the hallmark of her artistic...
All The Worlds Riches

All The Worlds Riches

These works were part of a show, called “All the World’s Riches”. It was curated by Los Angeles based artist, Dai Toyofuku and hosted in artist Allison Alford’s apartment. The artists that participated are Michael Bizon, Michael Carter, Oona Gardner, Melanie Moore, William Ransom, Luis Rendon, Christian Tedeschi, Dai Toyofuku and Allison Alford. Each of the artists installed work throughout the apartment.  Click here to visit Allison’s website for installation shots. Allison lived with the art for two weeks. Part of her interest in doing this is wondering what happens dynamically when art leaves the gallery and comes into a home. Does it become a passive object and/or is it integral to shaping her everyday experience? She documented living with the work through the video which you can view...